Showing posts tagged with “nerdfighter”

"I’m in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we’re all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we’ll ever have, and I am in love with you."
-Augustus Waters (The Fault in Our Stars by John Green)

"I’m in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we’re all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we’ll ever have, and I am in love with you."

-Augustus Waters (The Fault in Our Stars by John Green)

LAST GPOY OF THE YEAR. So Takumi Hikohito has the legendary fox hat? Behold, dudes and dudettes—I got myself a wolf hat. I like to think of it as the direwolf hat. No one can catch the mother-effing direwolf. Especially if her name is Nymeria nudge, nudge, Game of Thrones fans, and if she is Takumi’s fox’s first cousin once removed. Or something like that.
LOL. Anyway, thank you for a year full of recs, reviews, raves and rants! There’s nothing like chatting with and cyber-high-fiving people who can relate to my nerdery. So yeah, fellow nerdfighters and bookworms and all kinds of geeks out there, let’s continue to decrease world suck in our own little ways! And of course—
 DFTBA!

LAST GPOY OF THE YEAR. So Takumi Hikohito has the legendary fox hat? Behold, dudes and dudettes—I got myself a wolf hat. I like to think of it as the direwolf hat. No one can catch the mother-effing direwolf. Especially if her name is Nymeria nudge, nudge, Game of Thrones fans, and if she is Takumi’s fox’s first cousin once removed. Or something like that.

LOL. Anyway, thank you for a year full of recs, reviews, raves and rants! There’s nothing like chatting with and cyber-high-fiving people who can relate to my nerdery. So yeah, fellow nerdfighters and bookworms and all kinds of geeks out there, let’s continue to decrease world suck in our own little ways! And of course—

 
DFTBA!

whatatreacherousthing:

‘So if you see someone doing this you know to not to shoot them.’

whatatreacherousthing:

‘So if you see someone doing this you know to not to shoot them.’

(Source: starlorder)

"When did we see each other face-to-face? Not until you saw into my cracks and I saw into yours. Before that, we were just looking at ideas of each other, like looking at your window shade but never seeing inside. But once the vessel cracks, the light can get in. The light can get out."
-Paper Towns (John Green)

"When did we see each other face-to-face? Not until you saw into my cracks and I saw into yours. Before that, we were just looking at ideas of each other, like looking at your window shade but never seeing inside. But once the vessel cracks, the light can get in. The light can get out."

-Paper Towns (John Green)

Summer Re-read| Paper Townsby John Green 
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We’ve already heard that hackeneyed maxim about the journey being the destination. I have encountered a lot of novels attempting to embed this saying to the roots of their very plotlines, but nothing really stands out in exemplifying its deep meaning in a new level…save John Green’s books.
Here’s the thing about Green’s novels: if you’ll zoom out, you can see the obviously formulaic patterns that serve as the backbone storylines. Geeky, quirky protagonists? Check. Funny, interesting sidekicks? Check. Attractive, enigmatic girl that our dweebish hero is so enamored with? Check. Tthe main characters seem to be always looking for something/someone. Despite these dead ringers of story foundations, what still made me a Green fan (and further gave birth to my inner nerdfighter-ness) is that if you zoom in and zero in on the story carefully, you’ll realize that the novels are all different at the core. An Abundance of Katherine’s real ‘road trip’ isn’t the literal one, but the trip that Colin takes where he reaches at the end a realization that relationships cannot be mathematically predicted, and that he matters, maybe not to the whole world but always to the person who can be the whole world to him. The ‘trip’ in Looking for Alaska is Pudge’s pivotal turn in his coming-of-age journey, one that pops out in the middle of the book with an emotional and moral blow that rippled throughout the second half of the book. Paper Towns is a different beast entirely, and here’s why…
Quentin ‘Q’ Jacobsen has always been smitten by his childhood friend and classmate, the spunky and adventurous Margo Roth Spiegelman. He has always loved her from afar until one night when she—dressed like a ninja—barges into his room to summon him to a revenge campaign. Just as Q thinks he is already seeing the real Margo up close, she disappears. Q thinks that Margo leaves clues for him, urging him down a disconnected path that may lead to where—or WHO—the real Margo is.
I’ve said this before and I’ll say this again: Green is adroit in juggling hilarity and poignancy. I’m already familiar with Green’s style, but the way he pulls off the ‘moving’ parts in this book is different. It has a similar feel to Looking for Alaska—only raised to the tenth power. At the surface, the story is telling you to find where Margo is when in fact the real mystery is finding her identity. It almost feels like a metaphorical, hardboiled crime fiction. Green leads the main character into a journey he will never forget, tagging along the readers with him. Through the labyrinthine set of clues ranging from paper metaphors and fragments of Whitman poetry to carefully selected music, Q unwittingly creates his own map to a destination he never planned—finding not Margo but finding himself instead. In many ways as pointed out by the book, Q is very similar to the hero of Moby Dick.
Paper Towns is divided in three parts (The Strings, The Grass, and The Vessel), all of which are accounts of journeys that reveal something about the characters. Aside from being driven by the characters, the story is also strongly propelled by the building blocks of deep thoughts and ideas that propped up the cliché-ish plot.
A story of obsession, friendship, romance, and life as a whole, Paper Towns is one of the most memorable bildungsroman for me. It’s my fourth time reading this, and still never ceases to move me.
Next re-read: Will Grayson, Will Grayson

Summer Re-read| Paper Towns
by John Green 

__

We’ve already heard that hackeneyed maxim about the journey being the destination. I have encountered a lot of novels attempting to embed this saying to the roots of their very plotlines, but nothing really stands out in exemplifying its deep meaning in a new level…save John Green’s books.

Here’s the thing about Green’s novels: if you’ll zoom out, you can see the obviously formulaic patterns that serve as the backbone storylines. Geeky, quirky protagonists? Check. Funny, interesting sidekicks? Check. Attractive, enigmatic girl that our dweebish hero is so enamored with? Check. Tthe main characters seem to be always looking for something/someone. Despite these dead ringers of story foundations, what still made me a Green fan (and further gave birth to my inner nerdfighter-ness) is that if you zoom in and zero in on the story carefully, you’ll realize that the novels are all different at the core. An Abundance of Katherine’s real ‘road trip’ isn’t the literal one, but the trip that Colin takes where he reaches at the end a realization that relationships cannot be mathematically predicted, and that he matters, maybe not to the whole world but always to the person who can be the whole world to him. The ‘trip’ in Looking for Alaska is Pudge’s pivotal turn in his coming-of-age journey, one that pops out in the middle of the book with an emotional and moral blow that rippled throughout the second half of the book. Paper Towns is a different beast entirely, and here’s why…

Quentin ‘Q’ Jacobsen has always been smitten by his childhood friend and classmate, the spunky and adventurous Margo Roth Spiegelman. He has always loved her from afar until one night when she—dressed like a ninja—barges into his room to summon him to a revenge campaign. Just as Q thinks he is already seeing the real Margo up close, she disappears. Q thinks that Margo leaves clues for him, urging him down a disconnected path that may lead to where—or WHO—the real Margo is.

I’ve said this before and I’ll say this again: Green is adroit in juggling hilarity and poignancy. I’m already familiar with Green’s style, but the way he pulls off the ‘moving’ parts in this book is different. It has a similar feel to Looking for Alaska—only raised to the tenth power. At the surface, the story is telling you to find where Margo is when in fact the real mystery is finding her identity. It almost feels like a metaphorical, hardboiled crime fiction. Green leads the main character into a journey he will never forget, tagging along the readers with him. Through the labyrinthine set of clues ranging from paper metaphors and fragments of Whitman poetry to carefully selected music, Q unwittingly creates his own map to a destination he never planned—finding not Margo but finding himself instead. In many ways as pointed out by the book, Q is very similar to the hero of Moby Dick.

Paper Towns is divided in three parts (The Strings, The Grass, and The Vessel), all of which are accounts of journeys that reveal something about the characters. Aside from being driven by the characters, the story is also strongly propelled by the building blocks of deep thoughts and ideas that propped up the cliché-ish plot.

A story of obsession, friendship, romance, and life as a whole, Paper Towns is one of the most memorable bildungsroman for me. It’s my fourth time reading this, and still never ceases to move me.

Next re-read: Will Grayson, Will Grayson

MARGO ROTH SPIEGELMAN. Spunky, mysterious and adventurous, she really does deserve a Nobel Peace Prize for Awesome (right, Ben Starling?). She’s my favorite John Green heroine…i fell in love with her as hard as Q-boy did. XD

MARGO ROTH SPIEGELMAN. Spunky, mysterious and adventurous, she really does deserve a Nobel Peace Prize for Awesome (right, Ben Starling?). She’s my favorite John Green heroine…i fell in love with her as hard as Q-boy did. XD

❤ for John Green!

❤ for John Green!

YOU PREFER UNICORNS TO ZOMBIES? MY GOD, I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF YOU’RE MY BROTHER ANYMORE! “Hank, you probably don’t know this but young adult authors are feuding for months over the question of whether or not zombies or unicorns are preferable. And I frankly cannot believe that a member of my own family is on the unicorn side.”
-John Green 

This vid is a little old, and I just stumbled upon it a couple of days ago while searching infos about John Green’s novella called Zombicorns (which has nothing to do about unicorns, as stated in the disclaimer). He’s on Team Zombies! Wooot!

And I just wondered, if he has this public anti-unicorn declaration of sorts, why hasn’t he contributed to the Zombies vs. Unicorns anthology? Meh. Not that it’s a big deal. At least he wrote his own piece about it. :)Will definitely provide a review for the novella.

CHARACTER OF THE DAY. Alaska Young from Looking for Alaska by John Green. A spontaneous, enigmatic, and self-destructive girl, Alaska catches the heart of Miles “Pudge” Halter—the main male protagonist—from the very beginning. She is outgoing and creative, has a passion for literature (as proved by her “Life Library”), lives in the Now, and is a very deep person that’s in constant search for the way out of the “labyrinth” of her life.

CHARACTER OF THE DAY. Alaska Young from Looking for Alaska by John Green. A spontaneous, enigmatic, and self-destructive girl, Alaska catches the heart of Miles “Pudge” Halter—the main male protagonist—from the very beginning. She is outgoing and creative, has a passion for literature (as proved by her “Life Library”), lives in the Now, and is a very deep person that’s in constant search for the way out of the “labyrinth” of her life.

"I love you so much and I just want you to love me like I love you," he said as softly as he could.

"You don’t need a girlfriend, Colin. You need a robot who says nothing but ‘I love you’." And it felt like being stoned and sticked from the inside, a fluttering and then a sharp pain in his lower rib cage, and then he felt for the first time that a piece of his gut had been wretched out of him.

—An Abundance of Katherines (John Green)

When you stopped wishing things wouldn’t fall apart, you’d stop suffering when they did.

—Looking for Alaska (John Green)

I finally got An Abundance of Katherines today! I would’ve bought Scott Westerfeld’s Leviathan, but this is the only copy left in the nearest bookstore. :3 I hope this one’s good! I liked Looking for Alaska. :)

I finally got An Abundance of Katherines today! I would’ve bought Scott Westerfeld’s Leviathan, but this is the only copy left in the nearest bookstore. :3 I hope this one’s good! I liked Looking for Alaska. :)